Categories
Humanities

Check the rubric before writing the essay.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities question and need a reference to help me learn.
Check the Rubric before writing the essay.

Categories
Humanities

Learning goal: i’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Romanticism in Music
Read the discussion on Romantic Music and answer the prompt at the bottom of the page.
In general, the term “Romanticism” applied to music has come to mean the period roughly from the 1820s until 1910. The contemporary application of “romantic” to music did not coincide with modern categories. In 1810, E.T.A. Hoffmann called Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven the three “Romantic Composers,” while Ludwig Spohr used the term “good Romantic style” to apply to parts of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. By the early twentieth century, the sense that there had been a decisive break with the musical past led to the establishment of the nineteenth century as “The Romantic Era,” and as such it is referred to in the standard encyclopedias of music.
However the twentieth century general use of the term “romanticism” amongst music writers and historians did not evolve in the same way as it did amongst literary and visual arts theorists, so that there exists a disjunction between the concept of romanticism in music and in the other arts. Literary and visual art theorists tend to consider romanticism in terms of the alienation of the artist and the value of art for art’s sake, concepts only gradually creeping into musicology, where there is still considerable confusion between “music of Romanticism” and the less definable, (perhaps somewhat redundant) category of “music of the Romantic Era.” The traditional discussion of the music of Romanticism includes elements, such as the growing use of folk music, which are more directly related to nationalism and are only indirectly related to Romanticism.
Some aspects of Romanticism are already present in eighteenth-century music. The heightened contrasts and emotions of Sturm und Drang seem a precursor of the Gothic in literature, or the sanguinary elements of some of the operas of the period of the French Revolution. The libretti of Lorenzo da Ponte for Mozart, and the eloquent music the latter wrote for them, convey a new sense of individuality and freedom. In Beethoven, perhaps the first incarnation since the Renaissance of the artist as hero, the concept of the Romantic musician begins to reveal itself—the man who, after all, morally challenged the Emperor Napoleon himself by striking him out from the dedication of the Symphony no. 3, the Eroica Symphony. In Beethoven’s Fidelio he creates the apotheosis of the “rescue operas” which were another feature of French musical culture during the revolutionary period, in order to hymn the freedom which underlay the thinking of all radical artists in the years of hope after the Congress of Vienna.
Beethoven’s use of tonal architecture in such a way as to allow significant expansion of musical forms and structures was immediately recognized as bringing a new dimension to music. The later piano music and string quartets, especially, showed the way to a completely unexplored musical universe. The writer, critic (and composer) Hoffmann was able to write of the supremacy of instrumental music over vocal music in expressiveness, a concept which would previously have been regarded as absurd. Hoffmann himself, as a practitioner both of music and literature, encouraged the notion of music as ‘programmatic’ or telling a story, an idea which new audiences found attractive, however, irritating it was to some composers (for example, Felix Mendelssohn). New developments in instrumental technology in the early nineteenth century—iron frames for pianos, wound metal strings for string instruments—enabled louder dynamics, more varied tone colors, and the potential for sensational virtuosity. Such developments swelled the length of pieces, introduced programmatic titles, and created new genres such as the free standing overture or tone-poem, the piano fantasy, nocturne and rhapsody, and the virtuoso concerto, which became central to musical Romanticism. In opera a new Romantic atmosphere combining supernatural terror and melodramatic plot in a folkloric context was most successfully achieved by Carl Maria von Weber’s Der Freischütz (1817, 1821). Enriched timbre and color marked the early orchestration of Hector Berlioz in France, and the grand operas of Giacomo Meyerbeer. Amongst the radical fringe of what became mockingly characterized (adopting Wagner’s own words) as “artists of the future,” Liszt and Wagner each embodied the Romantic cult of the free, inspired, charismatic, perhaps ruthlessly unconventional individual artistic personality.
It is the period of 1815 to 1848, which must be regarded as the true age of Romanticism in music—the age of the last compositions of Beethoven (d. 1827) and Schubert (d. 1828), of the works of Schumann (d. 1856) and Chopin (d. 1849), of the early struggles of Berlioz and Richard Wagner, of the great virtuosi such as Paganini (d. 1840), and the young Franz Liszt and Sigismond Thalberg. Now that people are able to listen to the work of Mendelssohn (d. 1847) stripped of the Biedermeier reputation unfairly attached to it, he can also be placed in this more appropriate context. After this period, with Chopin and Paganini dead, Liszt retired from the concert platform at a minor German court, Wagner effectively in exile until he obtained royal patronage in Bavaria, and Berlioz still struggling with the bourgeois liberalism which all but smothered radical artistic endeavor in Europe, Romanticism in music was surely past its prime—giving way, rather, to the period of musical romantics.
Music after 1848
Romantic nationalism—the argument that each nation had a unique individual quality that would be expressed in laws, customs, language, logic, and the arts—found an increasing following after 1848. Some of these ideals, linked to liberal politics, had been exemplified in Beethoven’s antipathy to Napoleon’s adoption of the title of emperor, and can be traced through to the musical patriotism of Schumann, Verdi, and others. For these composers and their successors the nation itself became a new and worthy theme of music. Some composers sought to produce or take part in a school of music for their own nations, in parallel with the establishment of national literature. Many composers would take inspiration from the poetic nationalism present in their homeland. This is evident in the writings of Richard Wagner, especially after 1850, but can be clearly seen in Russia, where the Kuchka (handful) of nationalist composers gathered around Mily Balakirev, including Modest Mussorgsky, Alexander Borodin, and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. These composers were concerned about the enormous influence of German music in Russia, and they largely resented the founding of the conservatoires in Moscow and Saint Petersburg by the brothers Nikolai and Anton Rubinstein, which they believed would be Trojan horses for German musical culture (however, Russian romantic music is today now closely identified with Anton’s favorite pupil, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky).
This movement continued forward through into the twentieth century with composers such as Jean Sibelius, although nationalism found a new musical expression in study of folk-song which was to be a key element in the development of Béla Bartók, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and others.
“The ‘Modernisms’ of the twentieth century all found roots in reactions to Romanticism, which was increasingly seen as not realistic enough, even not brutal enough, for a new technological age.”
Prompt:
Considering the above statement, do you feel that 20th-21st century music is still reacting against the emotionalism, or sentimentalism of Romantic music? Is romanticism in music “not brutal enough” for this new age, or is the emotionalism, “storm and stress of Romanticism still very much a part of contemporary music–only now with words as well? Consider: Rock & Roll, Punk, Rap, etc. Give examples of specific music that supports your view on this question. Approx. 600 words
Below are two examples of Romantic music:
Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata (Links to an external site.)
Wagner’s Flight of the Valkyrie (Links to an external site.)
Rubric
Response Rubric (2) (1) (1)
Response Rubric (2) (1) (1)
CriteriaRatingsPts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeContent and OrganizationStudents responds with at least 5 paragraphs ( at least 5 sentences each) of focused coherent ideas on the prompt .
25 to >17.5 ptsHigh
The student has given concerted thought to the topic and writes from an informed point of view. She discusses each main point long enough to show clearly and specifically her meaning and intent. She supports each main point with arguments, examples, or details and presents a convincing rationale for her views. Her points are clearly related to the topic and to the main idea or impression he is trying to convey. No necessary points are overlooked and there is no padding.
17.5 to >7.5 ptsMiddle
The response gives the impression that the writer does not really focus on the prompt or does not fully understand the implications. They do not explain their points clearly or make them come alive for the reader.
7.5 to >0 ptsLow
It is either hard to tell what points the writer is attempting to make or else they are weak make no sense. The student does not explain his points; they only asserts them and then go on to something else, or they repeats them in a slightly different words.
25 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeGrammar and Mechanics
5 to >3.0 ptsHigh
There are no vulgar or illiterate errors in usage by present standards of formal written English. The sentence structure is most often correct, even in varied or complicated sentence patterns. The writer reveals an ability to manipulate complicated sentence patterns and he combines sentence kernels effectively.
3 to >1.0 ptsMiddle
. There are a few serious mistakes in usage and several in points that have been covered in class, but not enough to obscure meaning. The sentence structure is usually correct in familiar sentence patterns, but there are occasional errors in complicated patterns: errors in parallelism, subordination, consistency of tenses, reference of pronouns, etc.
1 to >0 ptsLow
There are so many serious errors in usage and sentence structure that the paper is hard to understand, or is incomprehensible.
5 pts
Total Points: 30
PreviousNext

Categories
Humanities

Include a reference page in turabian.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities multi-part question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Select 4 of the dances/dancers included in this week’s Learning Resources section to view and compare. If you want to research the dance or dancer further, feel free to consult additional sources. In your response, indicate which dances you are discussing. Answer the following questions (200-300 words), referring to the videos you view, to the information on dance found in chapter on dance, and to any additional sources you consult:
These dances represent a range of very different kinds of dancing. What elements unify the dances you selected? How do you see such different expressions as all fitting under the category of dance?
Which one was most unfamiliar to you? Did you enjoy that dance/dancer? Why?
In your view, which one best reflected or illuminated a culture or told a story? How?
Include a reference page in Turabian.

Categories
Humanities

The writing seems dependent on hackneyed fixed and cliché expressions.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities project and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Washington Irving is an American Romantic writer whose short stories often reflect the movement away from Enlightenment thinking with its insistence on the authority of Reason and its ability to verify objective reality to Romantic views that assert the power of the imagination and the emotion to create its own (subjective) reality.
In the short story “Adventure of the German Student”, Irving evokes the theme of the power of the imagination over reason in creating its own reality.
In a well thought out and composed essay, illustrate how this theme is evoked through Irvings use of setting (day/night, historical period-French Rev/Reign of Terror, Germany/France), character (Wolfgang, Woman, Police Officer), imagery (catacombs, decay, storm), and symbols (guillotine, overturn statue Henry IV-“head of State).
For example, in regard to characters, they may be seen as representing this theme with the Woman as representing Imagination and a subjective reality and the Police officer as representing Reason with his certainty of the woman’s history and the way he tests reality through the physical senses in the end. Wolfgang, the student, may represent the movement from Reason to Imagination in the action of the story.
Link to short story, “Adventure of the German Student” –Irving (Links to an external site.)
Approx. 700 words
Rubric
Literary Analysis (1)
Literary Analysis (1)
CriteriaRatingsPts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeIdea Development and Content
35 to >23.33 ptsHigh
The paper specifically focuses on the assigned topic and all components of the prompt. The student has given intensive thought to the topic and writes from an informed point of view. He discusses each main point long enough to show clearly and specifically his meaning and intent. He supports each main point with arguments, examples, or details and presents a convincing rationale for his views. His points are clearly related to the topic and to the main idea or impression he is trying to convey. No necessary points are overlooked and there is no padding.
23.33 to >11.67 ptsMiddle
The paper either treats the assigned prompt and its parts superficially, or incompletely (not addressing all parts of the assignment). The paper gives the impression that the writer does not really not fully understand the implications and scope of his writing. It does not explain its points clearly or make them relevant or cogent for the reader.
11.67 to >0 ptsLow
The paper may mention the assigned focus or prompt, but neither develops, or advances a particular thesis. It is either hard to tell what points the writer is attempting to make or else they are so weak that a revision would clarify points that often make no sense. The paper does not explain its points sufficiently, but only asserts them and then goes on to something else, or repeats the same points in slightly different words. The writer does not bother to check facts, and much of what is written may be incorrect or untrue.
35 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeOrganization
5 to >3.34 ptsHigh
The paper starts at a logical point, has a sense of purposeful movement, gets somewhere and then stops. The paper has an underlying strategy or plan that the reader can easily follow. Sometimes there is a little surprising twist at the end that makes the paper come out in a way that the reader did not anticipate, but is logically valid. Main points are treated at greater length and depth, others in proportion to their importance.
3.34 to >1.67 ptsMiddle
The organization of this paper is standard and conventional. There is usually a one paragraph introduction, three main points each treated in separate paragraphs, and a conclusion that often seems pasted on or forced. Trivial points are treated in greater detail than important points and there is usually insignificant or irrelevant points used as filler.
1.67 to >0 ptsLow
This paper starts randomly and has no focused movement. The main points are not clearly separated from one another, and they come in a haphazard order. The paper seems to have many false starts and chaotically jumps in many directions until the reader is lost.
5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeProper and Effective Use of Diction
5 to >3.5 ptsHigh
The writer incorporates a sprinkling of uncommon, but apt and precise words, or of familiar words in uncommon ways. They shows an interest in word choice and in putting them together in fresh and in a slightly unconventional manner. Some of these experiments with words may not quite come off, but this is such a promising attempt that a few mistakes may be forgiven. For the most part, they uses words appropriately and with a sense for nuances and personal voice.
3.5 to >2.0 ptsMiddle
The writing seems dependent on hackneyed fixed and cliché expressions. In experimenting with words, the writer often uses malapropisms and attempts to incorporate stilted or archaic language to gain a sense of sophistication.
2 to >0 ptsLow
The writer uses words so carelessly and inexactly that he gets far too many wrong. These are not intentional experiments with words in which lack of precision may be excused; instead, they represent a groping for words and using them without regard to their fitness, specificity, or aptness. A paper obviously demonstrating a limited vocabulary may also receive a low rating on this quality, even if no word usage is clearly wrong.
5 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeEnglish Usage and Sentence Structures
5 to >3.5 ptsHigh
There are no obvious or illiterate errors in usage by present standards of formal written English. The sentence structure is most often correct, even in varied or complicated sentence patterns. The writer reveals an ability to manipulate complicated sentence patterns and he combines sentence kernels effectively.
3.5 to >2.0 ptsMiddle
There are a few serious mistakes in usage and several in points that have been covered in class, but not enough to obscure meaning. The sentence structure is usually correct in familiar sentence patterns, but there are occasional errors in complicated patterns: errors in parallelism, subordination, consistency of tenses, reference of pronouns, etc.
2 to >0 ptsLow
There are so many serious errors in usage and sentence structure that the paper is hard to understand, or is incomprehensible.
5 pts
Total Points: 50
PreviousNext

Categories
Humanities

Learning goal: i’m working on a humanities question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Unit question: In prior units, the authors argue that the value of a philosophical education comes especially from its ability to challenge us to think beyond the received opinions of our communities, to think freely as full human beings, and to confront the inevitability of our worst fears, such as those of living, and dying. In this unit, we consider more carefully what it might mean to think and act freely in the face of this condition of or finiteness, and what its value is for our lives. We will read a selection from Simone de Beauvoir’s philosophy of freedom.
Things to do:
– Read Beauvoir
– Write your second 8-sentence assignment (prompt forthcoming)
Readings:
-Simone de Beauvoir, “Pyrrhus and Cineas” (7 pages)
-Simone de Beauvoir, selection from Ethics of Ambiguity (TBA; I am shooting for it to be at most 5 pages, though)

Categories
Humanities

Using your own judgment, pull out 4-5 big ideas or key concepts from our materials for this week.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
BACKGROUND
Oh, no! Kristin is sick this week. So, I am pushing back the due date of your first “Big Ideas” reflection papers from 9/28 to 10/5. This will give me time to better prepare you for what I *promise* will be an interesting small assignment. For our 9/28 class, I will have you watch the film connected to our next unit on Universalist Ethics: Judas and the Black Messiah. Please listen to this audio explainer: Plan for 921.m4a.
MATERIALS
Optional: Read Dr. Anika Prather’s Understanding Friendship through the Eyes of Aristotle – Antigone (antigonejournal.com)
Optional: Dr. Cori Wong’s Feminist Friendship & watch Meet Cori Wong – TEDxCSU
Required: Mia Mingus, Access Intimacy, Interdependence and Disability Justice | Leaving Evidence (wordpress.com)
Required: Our primary reading is María Lugones, Playfulness, “World”-Travelling, and Loving Perception (1987)
Optional, but helpful: Video Lecture: Lugones, “Playfulness, ‘World’-Travelling and Loving Perception” – YouTube
Optional: Examples of ‘big ideas’: List of philosophical concepts – Wikipedia & the Lugones Lexicon
PROMPT
Part A. Using your own judgment, pull out 4-5 big ideas or key concepts from our materials for this week. Examples might include “access intimacy” or “arrogant perception” or “playfulness.”
Part B. Then, focus on one of these big ideas and type out 2-3 quotes from the reading that explain this idea. These can just be in a list with no additional commentary. Make sure that this idea goes beyond common sense; make it something new to you that you might want to explain to a friend.
Part C. Explain this concept in a paragraph just using your own words and illustrating the big idea with an example of your own (from your life, Crip Camp, a favorite film, or a TV show).
Part D. (Not due until after everyone has posted): Respond with a paragraph to another group member’s post. Make this conversational, not critical or just complimentary. Expand on their ideas. Ask friendly questions. Draw connections.

Categories
Humanities

Sources must be cited in apa format, correct edition.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
For the last several weeks, you read through Gracism by David Anderson. From the readings, please share three ideas on how you can integrate the principles learned into engagement with minority, marginalized, and/or underserved populations. How is God calling you to minister to these populations? Be specific and relate your response back to what you have gleaned from the Gracism readings.
DISCUSSION ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS
The student will post one thread of 400-450 words.
Any articles cited must have been published within the last five years.
Acceptable sources include the course textbooks, the Bible, course presentations, course resources, and articles published in peer reviewed journals. Sources must be cited in APA format, correct edition.
Note: Rubric is attached, and must be strictly followed per the professor.

Categories
Humanities

(mo 3-1) analyze the “dream” from a female perspective in the past and as we experience life today

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
I need a Discussion of a minimum of 600 words about.
Overview:
Willa Cather’s masterful O Pioneers! is a story of broken cultural norms, the pursuit of dreams, and harsh reality as the proving ground for success. Cather’s heroine proves that women have a place in the dream, even during the arguably patriarchal 19th century. Consider if the character’s natural abilities, hard work and responsibility eventually lead her to a place of happiness and freedom.
Objectives
(MO 3-1) Analyze the “Dream” from a female perspective in the past and as we experience life today
(MO 3-2) Define gender expectations and cultural norms for the “Dream,” then and now
(MO 3-3) Craft a logical, coherent, and thought provoking essay analyzing some aspects of the “Dream,” based on the texts we have read and discussed thus far
(MO 3-4) Analyze whether “happiness” and “freedom” are mutually exclusive
Instructions
Read:
Cather, W. (1913). O Pioneers! (Dover Thrift)
PEW article on Women in Leadership (Links to an external site.)
PEW Article on Gender and Pay Gaps (Links to an external site.) https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/05/25/gender-pay-gap-facts/
Discussion Board Option 1 O Pioneers! and the land….In America’s past, cheap land has been available to those who cannot make it in the cities, who find cities filthy and unsafe, and those who do not like to live side by side with others. Cheap land has also been available to immigrants like the Bergsons, who are willing to work themselves to death in order to have a better life and opportunities. By the early 1900s, the frontier had disappeared and these free wheeling opportunities had been exhausted. Many historians have written about the loss of the frontier as a loss for the American frontier spirit.Look into “dry farming on the Great Plains” on Google and Google images to see O Pioneers! in action. What do you think is “the frontier spirit?” Can you show that it still exists today? Or has that spirit died with land ownership?Have you ever connected to the land in a way that Cather describes in O Pioneers!? Is there some place that is special or sacred to you, in which the natural world touches you? How does this work? Can you share it with us?
Discussion Board 2 for everyone Women in Leadership today please go to the links below and read these brief articles, posted by the PEW Research Center.http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2015/01/14/chapter-1-women-in-leadership/ (Links to an external site.)https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/05/25/gender-pay-gap-facts/ (Links to an external site.) How can we relate these current articles to Cather’s work? What is the status of women today, according to these demographic studies? (Please note the first is from 2015 and the second from 2020. Neither would reflect the effect of Covid disruption upon the workplace.) If you were to trace its trajectory, how are women approaching parity in life and in leadership? Discuss the process and evidences.

Categories
Humanities

Assume you are part of a startup organization that wants to lay off its workers.

Assume you are part of a startup organization that wants to lay off its workers. in less that 200 words advise on Costs associated with dysfunctional employee turnover

Categories
Humanities

What impressions did you have about these people from these media?

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities writing question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
This is an Essay for Humanities.
Identify your earliest exposure to people who were racially or culturally different from you through movies, television shows, or music.
What was your age?
Who was the person and how was he or she different?
What impressions did you have about these people from these media?
From a cultural pluralist’s perspective, do you think this experience was positive or negative for you?